Saturday, August 5, 2017

A little Less Photography

When I began astrophotography in the 80's there were literally just hundreds of astrophotographers in the world.  Thanks to the digital revolution, there are thousands upon thousands, many of which are very good.  Thirty years ago, all we had was film, but even today we still use our eyes to observe.  I must admit that for the last ten years or so astrophotography has held top billing for me. Observing took a back seat as my eyes were mostly held up in guiding images.

I was a keen deep sky observer back in the day. This means I would use optical instruments, primarily telescopes, to tickle out those faint fuzzies in the night sky.  These were various stellar and non-stellar objects such as star clusters, nebulae, galaxies, and planetary nebulae.  Photography has changed, but observing has changed little.

I don't like crowds.  I prefer to work alone and with the tools that I personally like to work with.  The end of the days working with film are all but gone.  I really do not want to join the crowds of digital mavens honing their crafts with the latest gadgets and squirrel cage wheel of innovation.  More and more I just want to observe. I've grown tired of photography.  The stream of Milky Way images have never been greater.  It's time to move on.

My eyes have aged, but they are essentially the same.  Age has also given me the wisdom to see once again that the act of observing as much more precious.  The photograph pales to the direct experience of observing.

Last night I could see what I have been missing.  A pair of binoculars on a tripod and a sweep of the skies made the case for returning to my roots.  The downside is in the sharing.  I may post a photo or two to convey just where I am looking, but the projected images on my retina are solely mine.

Observing - The direct act of communion with the Cosmos

Photography has given me so much pleasure and insight into the Milky Way.  The cake has been iced.

Now it's time to enjoy a slice.